How Uhuru Could Allow for a Raila, Ruto 2022 Alliance - Manyora

  • President Uhuru Kenyatta, William Ruto and Raila Odinga hold hands during the Interdenominational prayers at the KICC. Panelist Herman Manyora on November 18 called upon the leaders to statesmen and put the country first. File
  • Political analyst Herman Manyora, speaking on a panel on NTV's Am Live on November 18, argued that a sit-down between President Uhuru Kenyatta, his deputy William Ruto and ODM leader, Raila Odinga, would set the stage for a different kind of political alliance in 2022.

    The political tension that Manyora claimed the country was experiencing, was due to the apparent exclusion of the deputy president from the March 9, 2018, handshake between President Kenyatta and Raila.

    Manyora argued that a sitdown between the three leaders would ensure the smooth running of the country and as a result prompt president Uhuru to leave it up to Raila and Ruto to work out a 2022 leadership strategy.

    President Uhuru Kenyatta claps on as Raila Odinga and William Ruto shake hands. On November 18, panelist Herman Manyora urged the leaders to work together in securing the country's future.
    President Uhuru Kenyatta claps on as Raila Odinga and William Ruto shake hands on May 31, 2018, at the Safari Park Hotel.

    "I am calling upon the three gentlemen to become statesmen. Where Ruto will have to sacrifice what is obviously his in an arrangement in which he might not be president or Raila sacrifices what now looks certain that he may be president in 2022," Manyora stated.

    "And then in that arrangement, Uhuru may then leave the leadership to these two gentlemen despite wanting to stay on," he added.

    Manyora admitted that the unity of the three leaders could result in the country lacking an opposition party, but insisted the country would, nevertheless, experience tremendous growth under that setup.

    "If Uhuru, Raila, and Ruto were to sit down today, in much light to when Uhuru Raila shook hands, this country would go forward in a very smooth way, it may mean in two, three election cycles, there may be no opposition but it will accord them serious pace in the run for leadership." He reiterated.

    He was contributing to a discussion occasioned by the lead story on The Standard's Monday issue titled "Who's fooling who?".

    He conceded that Uhuru could have been playing either of the two leaders (Raila or Ruto) but insisted that what was best for the country was the leaders working together.