Electric Cars: Kenya Power Opens 3 Charging Stations, More to Follow

  • Kenya Power and Lighting Company engineers load a transformer onto a lorry.
    Kenya Power and Lighting Company engineers load a transformer onto a lorry.
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  • The Kenya Power company, popularly known by its NSE ticker KPLC, has opened three charging stations in Nairobi and will be setting on a nationwide project installing other charging points along major highways, parking lots and malls.

    The three charging stations in Nairobi are located at the Two Rivers Mall, the Hub Karen and at the Thika Road Mall.

    Speaking during the project unveiling ceremony that was held on March 2, KPLC managing director Bernard Ngugi said that the company was developing appropriate infrastructure to enable use of electric cars and that the project would start in Nairobi.

    “As part of our implementation plan, we are developing appropriate infrastructure and building internal capacity to enable use of electric vehicles across the value chain.

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    Viju Patel (right) and his son Jayesh Patel (left) pose with the Tesla Model X 75D
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    “To this end, we plan to set up charging facilities across the country beginning with Nairobi to support direct charging of vehicles,” Ngugi said.

    Kenya reduced the excise duty on cars from twenty percent to ten percent with the aim of encouraging Kenyans to buy electronic cars.

    This has encouraged some Kenyans to buy Teslas and it has also led to the growth of Nopia Ride which is a taxi-hailing service that uses electric cars.

    The average cost of purchasing an electric car is Ksh6 million. The cars take about an hour to fully charge and can be driven for up to two hundred and fifty kilometres.

    The United Nations Environment Programme(UNEP) in partnership with KPLC, unveiled a pilot electric bikes project on Tuesday, March 2.

    KPLC will receive fifty electronic bikes from UNEP which will be used to test usage in Kenya.

    The electric bikes are donated by Shen-zhen Shenling Car Company and will involve employees from selected agencies using the electric bikes in their day-to-day activities. The test project will last for six to twelve months.

    Joyce Msuya, UNEP deputy executive director, while speaking during the same event said that the project would help reduce air pollution.

    “Shifting to electric bikes in Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and elsewhere will reduce costs, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions as well as create jobs,” she said.

    Finnish company Noparide introduced a shareable electric car in Nairobi that aims to increase driver’s income by cutting fuel costs. on August 10 2020
    Finnish company Noparide introduced a shareable electric car in Nairobi that aims to increase driver’s income by cutting fuel costs. on August 10 2020
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