Two Brothers Build Egg Incubators Using Old Basins

  • A sample of the egg incubators made by Mark Kiplel and Dennis Kiplel
    A sample of the egg incubators made by Mark Kiplel and Dennis Kiplel
    NTV
  • Two brothers, Mark Kiplel and Dennis Kiplel, from Nakuru, took advantage of the safety measures implemented during the pandemic in 2020 to harness their creative skills.

    Forced to stay at home for about nine months, the duo collaborated to build egg incubators using old basins, among other items. Mark assembles the incubator while Dennis, who pursued animal science, focuses on the eggs until they hatch. 

    Speaking to NTV on Tuesday, November 8, the two lauded their parents, who helped fund the venture in its inception.  

    "My journey began in 2020 during the pandemic. My education was halted due to the curfew and inter-county lockdown measures put in place.

    A collage of two brothers Dennis Kiplel (left) and Mark Kiplel (right)
    A collage of two brothers Dennis Kiplel (left) and Mark Kiplel (right)
    NTV

    "It was during the long break that I decided to make the incubator," Mark recounted.

    The innovation can hold a maximum of 38 eggs and is sold for Ksh3,500 to farmers across the country from areas like Kitale, Mombasa, and Kisumu who are focused on chicken rearing.

    They attributed the popularity of the product to the pocket-friendly price.

    Besides the basin, the incubator includes a thermostat, bulb holder, bulb, and fan. However, one of the parts used is imported from China, where they get it at a lower price.

    The bulb provides the eggs with heat, the thermostat regulates the temperature between 37.5 degrees and 38.0 degrees.

    On the other hand, the fan is used to distribute the heat inside the enclosed incubator.

    Dennis noted that they only use medium-sized eggs to place in the incubator. Some of the eggs, he stated, had deformities like double yokes or lacked necessary cells.

    "We are selective in the eggs we place in the incubators," Dennis explained. 

    They conclusively called upon the youths to be creative and create jobs for themselves that benefit the larger community. 

    The Kiplel brothers noted the profits from the thriving agribusiness are being used to rear chicken.

    File image of a chicken peg
    File image of a chicken peg
    File