Driver Flees After Knocking Down Electricity Poles in Kileleshwa [VIDEO]

  • The lorry driver who knocked down the electricity poles in Nairobi's Kileleshwa estate.
    The lorry driver who knocked down the electricity poles in Nairobi's Kileleshwa estate.
    Twitter
  • A lorry driver was on Friday, July 3, captured on video driving away from the scene after knocking down several electricity poles in Nairobi's Kileleshwa estate.

    The incident occurred on Mandera road as onlookers watched in horror.

    In a video circulated online, the driver is seen accelerating despite being entangled in the wires. He eventually manages to get free.

    During the escape, the lorry driver left the dismantled poles and wires on the road, potentially endangering the lives of road users.

    Residents in the area reported a blackout after the incident happened.

    Kenya Power responded to the incident with a crew dispatched to sort out the connection disruption.

    "Our crew is on the ground doing repairs on the line. All customers have been restored except the following areas. Mandera rd, Kandara rd, Kenya High School, Dik Dik Gardens, Siaya rd, Olkejuado rd, Gichugu rd, Emory Hotel, Gatundu Cresent, Gem lane, Durham road, Kieni Road and environs. We urge you to be patient as we finalize repairs on the line," the Utility company noted.

    Kenya Power has on several occasions launched campaigns for close surveillance on the network across the country to curb vandalism and other vices that negatively impact the power distribution system. 

    Kenya Power crew responding to the destruction of power lines in Kileleshwa on July 3, 2020.
    Kenya Power crew responding to the destruction of power lines in Kileleshwa on July 3, 2020.
    Twitter

    According to the Energy Act 2019, vandalism, theft, and damage of streetlights and power installations attract Ksh5 million fine, imprisonment for five years or both. 

    The utility company has collaborated with the police, local administration and locals to bring the perpetrators to book.

    “We wish to draw to the attention of our customers and the general public to the fact that it is a criminal offense to steal electricity, tamper with meters, or engage in illegal connections and vandalism,” a press release by Kenya Power in February 2020 read.

    Apart from the immediate loss of supply to customers, vandalism negatively affects the Company’s revenue and leads to an unnecessary capital cost for replacing the destroyed equipment.

    According to a 2018 electricity report by the World Bank, blackouts cost Kenya 25 days a year.