5 Reasons Uhuru Wants to Change Kibaki's Constitution

  • Former President Mwai Kibaki (left) with President Uhuru Kenyatta (right) in an event in 2010
    Former President Mwai Kibaki (left) with President Uhuru Kenyatta (right) in an event in 2010
    File
  • During President Uhuru Kenyatta's address on Wednesday, August 26, the head of state made it clear that the constitution needed a change after a 10-year run.

    His utterance came as the debate on the Building Bridges Initiative (BBI), which has nearly split the country, clocks a year since its launch in 2019.

    On several occasions, the head of state hailed the new changes, which are also supported by former Prime Minister Raila Odinga, as necessary to steer the country towards a more cohesive future.

    As the constitution clocks 10 years since its promulgation in 2010, Kenyans.co.ke dissects five changes that president Uhuru Kenyatta is looking to effect in the constitution.

    President Uhuru Kenyatta during an event with Raila Odinga
    President Uhuru Kenyatta during an event with Raila Odinga
    Twitter

    Two-thirds gender rule

    The 2010 Constitution was hailed after it introduced the two-thirds gender rule in all its elective positions but the implementation of the bill, amended in 2018, has proven quite the challenge.

    The BBI contains a new raft of proposals that promises the achievement of the Act, with political parties roped into the game to ensure both the male and female genders are appropriately represented.

    The choice of political parties being forced to enforce the rule is a new tact from the current one that requires the Parliament to implement it.

    “Parties should be compelled through the Political Parties Act to be consistent with the Constitution to meet the gender rule and other Constitutional measures of inclusion through their party lists,” reads the report in part.

    Strengthen Devolution

    Devolution was implemented in the 2010 constitution and has fairly been praised as a game-changer in transfering services closer to the people.

    Cracks, however, emerged after some of the counties were reportedly influenced by the political affiliations of their governors hence affecting service delivery.

    In the new alliance, the head of state proposes to create a system that will ensure county governments deliver to people and are held accountable while at it.

    Peaceful Elections 

    Prior to the 2018 handshake between the president and former prime minister, elections period had generally been marred with violence over highly polarised political affiliations.

    After the handshake, the duo embarked on a journey to ensure that the country's economy does not slow down as personal security wanes time after time.

    Inclusivity

    This touches on the executive position which President Uhuru seeks to ensure all communities across the country have been represented as well as female leaders promoted to high positions.

    Inclusivity has been one of the most challenging aspects of leadership that the country has faced so far.

    "Kenyans have failed to appreciate our God-given differences in how we think, the languages we speak, the regions we come from, and the way we worship," read the document.

    Both Uhuru and Raila have vowed to fight for inclusivity.

    Former President Mwai Kibaki greets his successor Uhuru Kenyatta.
    Former President Mwai Kibaki greets his successor Uhuru Kenyatta.
    Twitter
    violence fight