KNEC Makes Changes in KCSE/KCPE Requirements

  • Education CS Magoha speaking to learners of Chavakali High School, Vihiga County on March 6, 2021.
    Education CS Magoha speaking to learners of Chavakali High School, Vihiga County on March 6, 2021.
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  • Kenya National Examinations Council (KNEC)  has lessened its stance after uproar from headteachers and parents over its new national examinations requirement.

    In an earlier circular, the examinations body had directed that no school should register less than 40 students for both Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) and Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE).

    In a new turn of events, KNEC has revised the requirement downscaling the threshold to only 30 students to accommodate as many schools as possible.

    The institution headed by CEO Mercy Karogo had directed that in case of a deficit - the affected institutions should register the students in neighbouring schools.

    Kenya National Examinations Council (KNEC) house along Dennis Pritt Road in Nairobi
    Kenya National Examinations Council (KNEC) house along Dennis Pritt Road in Nairobi.
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    School heads raised issues regarding the directive affirming that they are worried about losing candidates should parents realize that their schools may not meet the threshold. 

    Karogo noted that the decision was reached after a meeting between the body and Kenya Private Schools Association (KPSA) officials.

    "Following consultation with Kenya Private Schools Association (KPSA)under the guidance of Ministry of Education, there shall be no registration of new examination centers with less than 30 candidates for both public and private schools," stated Karogo in a letter.

    KPSA Chief Executive Peter Ndoro had raised concerns that the initial directive would lock up as many as 3,800 schools. Most of them would be drawn from the association.

    Ndoro further stated that the directive was made without consulting key education stakeholders. 

    "This is not only an abuse to the doctrine of stakeholder participation as provided for in our constitution but an attack on private schools aimed at disrupting progress made in expanding access to the provision of quality education in our country.

    "If I'm a private school investor and I'm taking my student to another school probably those children will pull others to that school meaning that my business will be destabilized which is not right. KNEC should revoke that directive," he noted.

    Parents from Baringo had also raised concerns regarding the scarcity of schools in the area. The parents had also argued that the move would destabilize students who would have to adapt to a new environment.

    KNEC is currently in a rush to conduct two national examinations (2021 KCPE and KCSE exams) in March 2022 before the normal school calendar resumes in 2023. 

    KNEC acting CEO Mercy Kerogo
    KNEC acting CEO Mercy Kerogo
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