Over 40K Kenyans Students Affected by Museveni's Latest Schooling Guidelines

  • Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni addressing the press on measures to handle Covid-19 on Saturday, March 21.
    Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni addressing the press on measures to handle Covid-19 on Saturday, March 21.
  • President Yoweri Museveni's latest move to further postpone school reopening in Uganda has far-reaching implications, with many Kenyan students who school in the country now stranded.

    The indefinite postponement is due to rising cases of Covid-19 infections in the country, with very few vaccines available in the country.

    Following the numerous postponements, already some Kenyan students had moved back to Kenyan schools.

    The few who had been eagerly waiting for the announcement of the reopening date have now been thrown into further confusion and frustration.

    Before the Covid-19 pandemic, reports by the Kenyan government show that over 40,000 Kenyans were studying in Uganda, at different levels and institutions. 

    This huge number has been forced to stay at home for almost two years now, as covid-19 numbers surge each day. 

    These guidelines have left thousands of Kenyan students frustrated as most of them were yet to complete their courses.

    Image of Makerere University in Uganda
    Image of Makerere University in Uganda
    wikipedia

    The guidelines issued in March were that schools remain closed for only 30 days, as health officials assess the situation. 

    However, as time went by, the infections got worse and the government had to keep procrastinating the school reopening dates. 

    Last week, the education officials in Uganda met and urged president Museveni to reopen the schools next month, October. 

    This information brought hope to the Kenyan students who have been waiting for the longest time to go back to class and complete their studies. 

    However, in a report in the Daily Monitor, a publication in Uganda, Museveni declined the request, saying that it is dangerous for the learners and teachers. 

    “Given the emerging realities of low vaccination rate of teachers, non-teaching staff and students above 18 years, the President asked us to rethink another date and report back next week,” remarked the Ugandan Ministry of Education spokesperson, Dennis Mugimba.

    Pushing the reopening dates further has thrown the Kenyan students in confusion, even as some move back to Kenyan schools and universities. 

    Students graduating from a Ugandan University
    Students graduating from a Ugandan University
    The Campus Times