Manhunt Launched for Fake Nyandarua County Commissioner

  • Nyandarua County Commissioner, Benson Leparmorijo.
    Nyandarua County Commissioner, Benson Leparmorijo.
    File
  • Police officers in Nyandarua County are seeking to arrest a person extorting residents and area chiefs while impersonating the area County Commissioner.

    During the Mashujaa Day celebrations, Nyandarua County Commissioner, Benson Leparmorijo cautioned the residents against falling prey to the imposter.

    Leparmorijo admonished the residents for handing out bribes for favors, noting that there were a number of cases where the suspect had committed extortion.

    “The person has gone to the extent of calling chiefs in my name demanding money on promises that he would consider them for promotion,” he said.

    Police officers at a scene in a previous incident
    Police officers at a scene of crime in a previous incident
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    He assured the residents that the County Criminal Investigating officers had been notified of the matter and that the perpetrator would be brought to justice. Leparmorijo urged those seeking various government services to always ensure they visited respective government offices to avoid falling prey to impersonators.

    On Thursday, July 23, Senior Superintendent of Police Isaac Thuranira Muriuki disclosed the tricks police imposters used to scam Kenyans. In the new scheme, the imposters often rush to the police station claiming to have been robbed in order to obtain a police abstract form.

    Upon leaving the station, they scan around for unsuspecting victims who are falsely accused of robbery.

    "A person will come to make a report that his phone has been stolen which is not the truth. They were targeting the OB number. They will leave and will present themselves to Kenyans as police officers.

    "Most shocking was the fact that they had a device that looked like a police radio phone which they have used to con many people" stated Muriuki. He further noted that thugs have devised a new trick in where they record a video and share it with their victims demanding a ransom.

    "They often put their victims in the boot of their cars and they first steal their possessions. After that, they record videos that are shared with the victim's family members. They demand at least Ksh100,000 and after the victim's family has settled settle the amount, they set them free," he added.
     

    Kenya Police Officers inspecting a prison facility.
    Kenya Police Officers inspecting a prison facility.
    File