Fact Check on Uhuru Letter Refusing to Meet OKA Principals

  • President Uhuru Kenyatta speaking in Edinburgh, Scotland, during a business meeting with the Scottish Africa Business Association (SABA).
    President Uhuru Kenyatta speaking in Edinburgh, Scotland, during a business meeting with the Scottish Africa Business Association (SABA) on Wednesday, November 11.
    PSCU
  • State House Spokesperson Kanze Dena on Tuesday, November 9, dismissed a statement making rounds on social media alleging that President Uhuru Kenyatta had halted meetings with OKA leaders.

    The fake letter, which had been addressed to all OKA leaders, alleged that the president had expressed his dissatisfaction with what was described as deliberate distortion of information emanating from the meetings with the principals.

    "The president termed it unfortunate that the OKA principals have been trivializing the meetings that they themselves sought, diverting the focus from his core call for unity," reads the statement.

    OKA principals Musalia Mudavadi (ANC), Kalonzo Musyoka (Wiper), Gideon Moi (KANU) and Moses Wetangula (Ford Kenya) on Thursday, August 19, 2021
    OKA principals Musalia Mudavadi (ANC), Kalonzo Musyoka (Wiper), Gideon Moi (KANU) and Moses Wetangula (Ford Kenya) address the press on Thursday, August 19, 2021
    File

    Speaking to Kenyans.co.ke, Kanze indicated that the statement - which had purported to bear the signature of Head of Public Service Joseph Kinyua - should be treated as false.

    Experts warn netizens to be vigilant of spreading fake news especially a year to the 2022 elections.

    The government is moving to curb the spread of fake news, especially on social media platforms by stipulating stiff penalties for anyone found guilty of the crime.

    During the launch of the National Computer and Cybercrime Coordination Committee (NCCCC) on Wednesday, November 4, Interior CS Fred Matiang'i warned there would be repercussions for netizens making false posts.

    "Operationalization of the National Computer and Cybercrime Coordination Committee signals repercussions awaiting those engaged in digital banditry," the CS revealed.

    President Kenyatta enacted the Computer and Cybercrimes Bill, 2017 providing a two-year jail term or Ksh5 million fine for spreading fake news in early 2020.

    “A person who intentionally publishes false, misleading or fictitious data or misinforms with the intent that the data shall be considered or acted upon as authentic, with or without any financial gain, commits an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding five million shillings or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or to both,” reads clause 12 of the new law.

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    Interior CS Fred Matiang'i addresses delegates at the National Miraa Scientific Conference held in Nairobi on Wednesday, October 27, 2021
    File