Details of High-Tech Training British Army Will Undertake in Kenya

  • British soldiers during a training exercise
    British soldiers during a training exercise.
    British Army
  • British Army is set to undergo a high-tech simulation exercise in Kenya in order to bolster its military muscles.

    According to Hadean, a metaverse startup, the soldiers will participate in cloud-based training to test how the technology works outside virtual reality.  

    It is designed to help UK soldiers to develop requirements for its collective training and transformation programme.

    The soldiers training in Kenya aim to demonstrate that cloud solutions can support training in different locations with data from multiple sources.

    A British soldier giving instructions during joint training with KDF in Samburu County on October 7, 2020.
    A British soldier giving instructions during joint training with KDF in Samburu County on October 7, 2020.
    Daily Nation

    Hadean's technology which will be used in Kenya, has a higher refresh rate.
     
    "The big benefit for us was to prove that cloud distributed simulation could work and be a solution for collective training," stated Hannah Smith, synthetic project officer with the British army.

    "Some of the soldiers will also have multiple systems on one person," she added.

    According to experts, some of the tricks and techniques the soldiers will learn in Kenya are contained in various video games.

    After the training, the soldiers are expected to be more technical and further use data to make some of their decisions in times of war.

    This came just months after the British Army Training Unit in Kenya (Batuk) defended its use of white phosphorus during military drills.

    Defending its use, UK soldiers insisted that the chemical is only used under strict safety precautions.

    The troops use the chemical for night illumination during training in different parts of the country, including Laikipia.

    "We do train with it when conditions allow. If it is very dry and windy, we do not use it because it can start a fire. In terms of its environmental impact, it is no different from other high explosives used by other militaries across the world," the soldiers clarified.

    A collage image of BATUK soldiers training in Kenya (LEFT) and white phosphorus fragments dispensed in the air (RIGHT).
    A collage image of BATUK soldiers training in Kenya (LEFT) and white phosphorus fragments dispensed in the air (RIGHT).
    File

     

    weapon fire.