Govt Gives Deadline to Demolish All Stalled Buildings

  • A bulldozer demolishes the home of the mother of former nominated MP Catherine Nyamato on Saturday, May 23, 2020, in Nyamira.
    A bulldozer demolishes the home of the mother of former nominated MP Catherine Nyamato on Saturday, May 23, 2020, in Nyamira.
    The Standard
  • The government through the National Construction Authority (NCA) on Tuesday, September 1, gave a deadline for all developers with stalled buildings to adhere to safety terms or face demolition.

    In a notice, the regulatory body noted that the abandoned construction sites and excavations posed a safety hazard to the public.

    "Developers with abandoned construction sites and deep excavations shall present to the Authority a structural integrity report from a structural engineer within 30 days from the date of the notice and a plan to proceed with works.

    A section of abandoned buildings in Huruma estate, Nairobi
    A section of abandoned buildings in Huruma estate, Nairobi
    The Standard

    "In absence of this report, the Authority will recommend necessary remedial action including but not limited to demolition and or repossession of the land by the government of Kenya," the statement read in part.

    Developers of abandoned sites were further instructed to proceed with the construction works in line with the conditions of approval and submit the necessary reports to the Authority.

    "In absence of plans to continue with the project as envisioned, to take steps to safely dewater and backfill the deep excavations with 30 days at the time of this notice. Upon lapse of the period, the Authority will recommend to relevant government agencies to take corrective steps at the cost of the respective developer," the authority directed.

    All developers with ongoing, abandoned or planned construction works with excavations exceeding a 3-metre depth were ordered to submit a geotechnical site investigation report.

    "The report should detail slope stability, monitoring programs and detailed studies of the effects of adjacent structures," NCA explained.

    The abandoned structures, especially in urban areas, have been linked to an increase in crime in some estates.

    In 2019, Kayole residents called for the demolition of abandoned structures in the area where they stated criminal gangs had taken over as their hideouts.

    Residents in Huruma estate decried the abandoned buildings as they were being used by muggers and rapists as hideouts as well as headquarters for their activities. 

    At the same time, excavations left by contractors pose a danger of drowning for children as well as a vector for water-borne diseases.